McFarland Clinic

Surgery

McFarland Clinic’s General Surgery specialists provide comprehensive preoperative, operative, and postoperative care for adult and pediatric patients with diseases, conditions, or injuries that require surgical expertise. The Surgery Department offers a knowledgeable, compassionate nursing staff to ensure that our pursuit of excellence maintains a personal, human touch.

Surgical procedures offered are performed at local area hospitals, as well as some in-office procedures. Our surgeons also provide second opinion consultations.

Our surgeons collaborate with referring physicians and other specialty departments to provide comprehensive management of a patient’s disease, especially for the treatment of cancer. We maintain a focus on breast health, colon health, and hernia repair.

Locations & Hours

Ames

1215 Duff Avenue Office

1215 Duff Ave
Ames, IA 50010

515-239-4427

Location Details on 1215 Duff Avenue Office

Hours

DayTime
Monday8am-5pm
Tuesday8am-5pm
Wednesday8am-5pm
Thursday8am-5pm
Friday8am-5pm

Carroll

Carroll Office

1214 South Grant Road
Carroll, IA 51401

712-792-1500

Location Details on Carroll Office

Hours

DayTime
Monday8am-5pm
Tuesday8am-5pm
Wednesday8am-5pm
Thursday8am-5pm
Friday8am-5pm

Grundy Center

Grundy County Memorial Hospital

201 East J Avenue
Grundy Center, IA 50638

641-752-6391

Location Details on Grundy County Memorial Hospital

Hours

Please contact the General Surgery Department for information regarding hours and scheduling for this outreach clinic.

Marshalltown

Marshalltown Office

312 East Main Street
Marshalltown, IA 50158

641-752-6391

Location Details on Marshalltown Office

Hours

DayTime
Monday8am-5pm
Tuesday8am-5pm
Wednesday8am-5pm
Thursday8am-5pm
Friday8am-5pm

Services

Services and procedures vary by location. Please contact our surgery department for more information.

Breast

  • Benign and malignant tumors
  • Lumpectomy/breast conservation
  • Mastectomy
  • Sentinel lymph node biopsy

Chemotherapy/IV Therapy Catheters

  • Vascular access ports and catheters

Dialysis Access

  • Arteriovenous fistula creation
  • Dialysis graft
  • Peritoneal dialysis catheter
  • Temporary and permanent hemodialysis catheter

Endocrine

  • Pancreas
  • Parathyroid
  • Thyroid operations

Gastrointestinal

  • Appendix
  • Anal problems such as fissure, fistula, and abscess
  • Endoscopy
    • Colonoscopy
    • Upper endoscopy
  • Colon disease
    • Colon cancer
    • Diverticulitis
    • Polyps
  • Feeding tubes
  • Gallbladder
  • Gastroesophageal reflux disease/ nissen fundoplication
  • Hemorrhoids
    • Hemorrhoid banding
    • Hemorrhoid excision
    • Non-operative hemorrhoid management options
    • Procedure for Prolapsed Hemorrhoids (PPH)
  • Stomach
    • Cancer
    • Reflux
    • Stomach ulcers

Hernia

  • Hiatal
  • Incisional
  • Inguinal
  • Open or laparoscopic
  • Umbilical
  • Ventral

Lung

  • Cancer
  • Chest tube placement
  • Collapsed lung
  • Minimally invasive options
  • Nodules

Robotic Surgery / Laparoscopic Surgery

  • Appendix
  • Colon
  • DaVinci Robotic Surgery
    • Hernia
    • Gallbladder
    • Colon
    • Nissen Fundoplication
  • Gallbladder including Single Incision Laparoscopic Surgery (SILS)
  • Gastroesophageal reflux disease
  • Hernia
  • Single-incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS)
  • Spleen

Skin and Soft Tissue

  • Cysts
  • Sarcoma
  • Skin lesions: benign and malignant
  • Soft tissue tumors
  • Melanoma
  • Lipoma

Other

  • Enlarged lymph nodes
  • Pilonidal cysts
  • Spleen
  • Temporal arteritis
  • Hidradenitis suppurativa

Second Opinion Consultations

In-Office Procedures

Patient Resources

Frequently Asked Questions

Consultation Preparation: What should I bring to my consultation?

It is helpful to our staff if you bring a list of your current medications, allergies, and insurance cards to every visit with us. Any records or testing that you may have had performed anywhere other than McFarland Clinic is also essential. If you have had radiologic studies done, our surgeons need the report and the actual pictures that were taken for their review. 

Consultation Preparation: Can I eat before my appointment?

Yes.

Consultation Preparation: Am I having surgery today?

No, your first visit with the surgeon is for a consultation only. At this visit, the surgeon will review your records and any testing you’ve had done, complete a thorough examination and recommend and discuss your surgical options. The actual procedure is set up for another day. Rarely, but occasionally a patient will have a problem so acute they will require surgery the same day.

Consultation Preparation: Do your surgeons accept Medicare?

Yes.

Consultation Preparation: Does your facility have an electronic health system?

Yes.  McFarland Clinic uses EPIC for its electronic medical record (EMR). We are able to share your medical record with any other provider or specialist from within McFarland Clinic.

Before Surgery: What type of anesthesia is used for the procedure?

In almost all instances, general anesthesia is used for major surgeries. A different type of anesthesia is used for colonoscopies. The type of anesthesia used will be discussed at your consultation.

Before Surgery: Why do I need a preoperative physical before my operation?

It is imperative for your body to be in top-notch condition prior to surgery. Your primary care provider will perform a complete physical for you oftentimes including laboratory studies, chest x-ray, and an electrocardiogram to assess your state of health. This information is especially important to the anesthesiologists. The physical examination is usually performed about seven days prior to surgery, but not more than 30 days in advance of surgery.  

Before Surgery: How should I prepare for my surgery?
  • If you take any blood-thinning medication, please talk with your surgeon immediately.  Often imes, these need to be stopped several days in advance of surgery. 

  • You need to have a preoperative physical prior to your surgical procedure. 

  • You should abstain from smoking and drinking alcohol the day before and the day of your surgery.  Nicotine causes your blood vessels to constrict, thus delaying healing time.  Alcohol can increase bleeding, which can also increase healing time. 

  • You should not have anything to eat or drink after midnight, the night before your operation.

  • You must have a responsible, licensed adult (18 years or older) who can drive you home after your operation or hospitalization. You will not be allowed to walk home or use public transportation, (taxi or bus system).

  • You should arrange for a friend or family member to be able to stay at home with you on the day of your procedure.

Before Surgery: What does clear liquids mean?

Clear liquids include water, any clear fruit juices (juices without pulp such as apple, white grape, white cranberry) tea, coffee, bouillon, soda pop, Jell-O (not red, orange, or purple). No solid foods. No milk products.

After Surgery: When can I drive after surgery?

You will not be allowed to drive for the first 24 hours after surgery due to the anesthetic used. Driving after that time period is individualized based upon the type of procedure you had and the type of pain medication you are taking. Please contact your surgeon’s nurse for more specific instructions on driving after surgery.

After Surgery: How soon can I return to work after my operation?

Again, this is individualized based upon the type of procedure done and the type of work you do. You will not be allowed to work for 24 hours after the surgery because of the nature of the anesthetic. Please contact your surgeon or his nurse for further work restrictions.

After Surgery: Why am I constipated?

Several factors including anesthesia, narcotic pain medications, and the stress of an operation can lead to constipation after surgery.  Some things you can do to relieve this include ambulation, drinking fluids, and eating fruits. Switching from narcotic pain medication to over-the-counter pain medications as soon as possible will also reduce constipation. If you have not had a bowel movement 2-3 days after surgery, please contact your surgeon’s nurse.

After Surgery: I'm having significant pain after my operation, what can I do?

No operation is pain-free. You are provided with a prescription for pain medication when you leave the hospital after your procedure.  Oftentimes heat or ice to the affected area will help with pain management. If you have pain that is not controlled with the pain medication you received, please contact our nursing staff for further instruction.

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